The Importance of Objectivity and Subjectivity in Film

The inherently collaborative nature of filmmaking.

December 13, 2020 11:59 AM

•  Published by

Cory McCabe

Making films is an art. A embodyment of craftsmanship.

A film is a piece of work from a group of very hardworking individuals.

Film is not just entertainment.

It is a very creative and collaborative process. An elaborate, exhausting, and thrilling operation, not to mention collaborative. And while it is creative and artistic, it requires quite often the need and ability of someone who can think critically. Someone who understands how to be objective.

Though through aimless attempts at creating something can come new inspiration for greater ideas, in general, filmmaking is not for the aimless and careless person who does everything without thought, or on a whim.

I think a lot of movie goers and tv watchers for get just how much time, effort, and care goes into films they watch.

The people behind the films that we watch, especially those running the show, know the importance of having to be both objective, while also adhering to the subjective thoughts and ideas of others involved.

  • Being objective means to be unbiased, not catering to one’s own feelings or opinions.
  • Being subjective means to listen to one’s own likes, desires, feelings and opinions.

When you read these two definitions, do you think of which is better than the other? Or do you look at both of those as simply two different ways that we can choose to operate by, and neither being greater or lesser than the other?

You’ll come to find out more and more about me that this is where I stem a lot of my identity from, where objectivity and subjectivity meet and coexist together. Everything in life is a balance.

I, very intentionally, strive to make decisions based on facts, what is most efficient, and what would eliminate the possibility of mistakes, while also staying true to myself and my personal desires, likes, and opinions.